Subject: Re: HTTP/1.1 RFC copyright statement
From: Kevin Bedell <kevin@kbedell.com>
Date: Fri, 17 Sep 2004 13:07:44 -0400


The OSD wouldn't apply to the protocol itself, but it *could* apply to software
that implements the protocol. Similarly, software could exist that implements
the protocol -- but that is commercial in nature and does not conform to the
OSD.

In fact, I'd wager that there *exist* software implementations of the protocol
that are released under licenses that conform to the OSD, and software
implementations that are released under licenses that *don't*.

Regarding the question of a 'Reference Implementation', the answer would seem to
swing exclusively on the particular license the code was distributed under.

The OSD generally refers to *copyright* issues, as opposed to other intellectual
property issues that may be associated with the protocol specification (e.g.,
patents).

If your question has to do with the document itself and its copyright, then the
OSD doesn't really apply; it's unlikely that anyone could freely modify and
redistribute the specification docuement itself.

Anyone disagree?

-kevin


Kevin Bedell
Black Duck Software
http://www.blackducksoftware.com

"Imagination is more important than knowledge."
 - Albert Einstein