Subject: AW: AW: AW: For Approval: German Free Software License
From: "Stephen C. North" <north@research.att.com>
Date: Mon, 29 Nov 2004 09:25:46 -0500 (EST)

	"I had the expectation that we could work together on some kind of
	compromise."

Interesting idea - specifically what compromise do you think is reasonable?


	"... For them it's a question of right or wrong. I have to accept this."

It is frustrating to have your proposal rejected.  (My group also went
through this.)

It helps to see the issue from the standpoint of a licensee or business
that relies on open source.  OSI certification is valuable because it implies
licensees and other parties can have a high degree of confidence that a
license does not have problems that interfere with using the software
as open source.  That's basically all the OSI has to offer.  The GFSL
proposal attacks the core of this model, because it's asking the OSI to
delegate its authority and reputation, to the GFSL authors.

Consider a similar situation: would the GFSL authors remove the conflicting
terms from the GFSL, and add the condition that the GFSL automatically
changes to agree with the OSI definition, even if that definition is
changed in the future?

So this situation may be frustrating but it's not surprising or unfair.

Stephen North