Subject: Re: The Death of Copyright
From: Russell Nelson <nelson@crynwr.com>
Date: Mon, 10 Jul 2000 13:38:40 -0400 (EDT)

This is a good explanation for the widespread disregard of copyright.
My take on it is that running a FSB is good practice for the future.  :)
-russ

 > Date: Sun, 02 Jul 2000 18:32:48 -0700
 > From: "Tim O'Reilly" <tim@oreilly.com>
 > Subject: The Death of Copyright
 > 
 > Energetic and readable article on the atrocities being performed on
 > copyright law.  Mostly focuses on music, but has some interesting
 > historical anecdotes and some great sidebar quotes:
 > 
 >     http://www.macedition.com/soup/soup_20000627a.shtml
 > 
 > I'm a publisher, and I agree that copyright law is getting way out of
 > hand.  Between software patents and extensions to copyright, we're
 > undermining the foundations of our culture's past success, which has
 > been based on free exchange of ideas.  Here's to the coming dark ages!
 > 
 > An excerpt:
 > 
 >  > In the past century, though, the wealthy and powerful have been
 >  > lobbying long and hard through international consortiums such as
 >  > WIPO to shift the balance of power back to the
 >  > publisher. Fourteen years became thirty. Then seventy five
 >  > years.  Then it became the life of the copyright holder. Then it
 >  > became life plus thirty. Now it's life plus seventy years,
 >  > applied retroactively, and ninety-five years if the copyright
 >  > holder is a corporation instead of a person. No copyright held
 >  > by a corporation has passed into the public domain since the
 >  > first World War. Nothing at all has passed into the public
 >  > domain since the end of the second world war unless the author
 >  > donated it. As bad as that is, the fallout from the murder of
 >  > copyright in the music industry is far, far worse. You see, most
 >  > of the music you hear on the radio is considered "work for
 >  > hire", which means even though the artist created and performed
 >  > the music, the record studio owns all rights to it. This was
 >  > unpleasant, but accepted by early recording artists, because,
 >  > after all, work for hire reverted from its owner to its creator
 >  > after 35 years. This was changed under the Digital Millennium
 >  > Copyright Act so record companies, immortal entities, now own
 >  > the copyrights in effective if not literal perpetuity. Tom Petty
 >  > and Metallica will never own the music they wrote and performed
 >  > while under a "work for hire" clause.
 >  >
 >  > Copyright is dead, a murder most foul, and the effect it's had
 >  > on our society, civilization, and culture is heartbreaking.
 > 
 > 
 > 
 > --
 > Tim O'Reilly @ O'Reilly & Associates, Inc.
 > 101 Morris Street, Sebastopol, CA 95472
 > +1 707-829-0515, FAX +1 707-829-0104
 > tim@oreilly.com, http://www.oreilly.com
 > 
 >