Subject: Re: Successful FSBs
From: Chip Mefford <cpm@well.com>
Date: Mon, 28 Oct 2002 10:07:55 -0800 (PST)



On Mon, 28 Oct 2002, Benjamin J. Tilly  wrote:

> "Tim O'Reilly" <tim@oreilly.com> wrote:
> > On 10/28/02 5:42 AM, "Stephen J. Turnbull" <stephen@xemacs.org> wrote:
> >
> > >
> > > My apologies.  I'm used to the lingo standard in economics, where
> > >
> > > "idea" == "creation" == "Work" == _invention_
> > >
> > > and
> > >
> > > "commercialization" == "productization" == "finding the right people"
> > > == _innovation_.
> > >
> > > I'll try to avoid that usage in the future.
> >
> >
> > Interesting.  I've never heard that before.  I would have thought that
> > invention == innovation, with productization and commercialization the
> > equivalent terms in the second syllogism.
>
> I would have thought the same thing, but now that I see
> it said, it makes sense.  Invention is coming up with
> something new.  Innovation is improving on what you
> already have.  Turning an idea into a product usually
> does involve producing a stream of innovations.

> snip

invent

\In*vent"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Invented; p. pr. & vb. n. Inventing.] [L.
inventus, p. p. of invenire to come upon, to find, invent; pref. in- in +
venire to come, akin to E. come: cf. F. inventer. See Come.] 1. To come or
light upon; to meet; to find. [Obs.]

innovate

\In"no*vate\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Innovated; p. pr. & vb. n. Innovating.]
[L. innovatus,p. p. of innovare to revew; pref. in- in + novare to make
new,fr. novus new. See New.] 1. To bring in as new; to introduce as a
novelty; as, to innovate a word or an act. [Archaic]

Webster's RUD.

Not the same.