Subject: Re: Unexercisable rights
From: DJ Delorie <dj@delorie.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Jun 1999 09:28:58 -0400


> Admittedly, smart people do fall prey to that fallacy (DJ Delorie
> did in his example about not reselling Adobe Photoshop).

If this is what you think, then you missed my point.  Yes, I know
about sunk costs and such, and I realize I've probably got a couple
thousand dollars worth of boxed software sitting on my shelf, and if I
was desperate for cash (I'm not) I could probably sell them.

That wasn't my point.

My point was that I consider software to be a service, not an
investment.  I paid a certain amount of money to get the ability to do
certain things, and I did those things enough to make the purchase
worth the cost.  I traded a certain amount of my stored value (money)
for a certain amount of transient value (use of the software) and I
feel it was a net benefit to myself, rather than a net loss.  The
software currently has no value to me (I'm not currently using it) but
neither does it represent unused stored value (because I used it
before).  At some point in the future, I may need those services
again, and the cost of obtaining them will be zero, as the software is
already here.  Since I've gotten sufficient value out of the software,
the cost of maintaining ownership is zero, and the odds of me using
them again is slightly non-zero (the kids might play with it, for
example), there's no further loss for me to hang on to it indefinitely
and no urge to make my purchase worth the price.  So I keep it.