Subject: Re: Studies
From: James Horton <horton@cft.net>
Date: Mon, 15 Sep 1997 15:09:05 -0400 (EDT)

I agree, even more so for Embedded Systems.

I do quite a bit of real-time, embedded systems, for
telephony, fire_alarm/security and such systems, and
the companies we build products for are REAL interested
in embedded, real-time unix or unix derivatives, now
that hardware is nearly a perfect commodity.


RTOS vendors have raped the embedded world of cost sensitive
equipment manufactures for a long time. Many manufacture's
try to lock us into a 'do not resale to 
anyone else' in our industry type of clauses in contracts.........
So, free software, with  bundled technical expertise, has
sent profits soaring. Many do not even require source code, as
long as licenses and fees are flat rate....... automatically
guaranteeing maintenace work. Typically, if sources are needed,
we write critical portions, with scarce documentation and acheive
the same goals.

Do you know how many phones, with the latest features, are base on
either 68xxx or X_86 type processors.......?  Most.





James



On Mon, 15 Sep
1997,
Kragen
Sitaker wrote:

> On Mon, 15 Sep 1997, Chris Maeda wrote:
> > The Forbes and ComputerWeek types probably think that
> > free software is much more expensive than proprietary
> > software.  Free software only seems to work in niches 
> > that are too small to support proprietary vendors. Once 
> > a market gets big enough, the superior economics 
> > (cheaper for users, more profits for vendors) of the 
> > proprietary model always win.
> 
> Well, I would argue that the GNU utilities disprove this by their
> existence and tremendous popularity.  Also, many proprietary OS vendors
> have thrived in markets much smaller than the three-million-or-so-user
> Linux market share; most commercial Unices, for example.
> 
> I've heard enough horror stories from Linux/NT/95 admins to convince me
> that the cost-of-ownership is not higher with free software.
> 
> Perhaps someone from Cygnus would have a more informed perspective than
> mine, however, given that they are the ones who have the best business
> view of the GNU development toolchain.  Do any of them still read the
> list, I wonder?
> 
> Kragen
> 

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