Subject: Re: Successful FSBs
From: "Jerry Dwyer" <gdwyer@dwyerecon.com>
Date: Mon, 28 Oct 2002 14:14:24 -0500

> On 10/28/02 5:42 AM, "Stephen J. Turnbull" <stephen@xemacs.org> wrote:
>
> >
> > My apologies.  I'm used to the lingo standard in economics, where
> >
> > "idea" == "creation" == "Work" == _invention_
> >
> > and
> >
> > "commercialization" == "productization" == "finding the right people"
> > == _innovation_.
> >
> > I'll try to avoid that usage in the future.

>> snip
>

From: Chip Mefford <cpm@well.com>
>invent
>
>\In*vent"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Invented; p. pr. & vb. n. Inventing.] [L.
>inventus, p. p. of invenire to come upon, to find, invent; pref. in- in +
>venire to come, akin to E. come: cf. F. inventer. See Come.] 1. To come or
>light upon; to meet; to find. [Obs.]
>
>innovate
>
>\In"no*vate\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Innovated; p. pr. & vb. n. Innovating.]
>[L. innovatus,p. p. of innovare to revew; pref. in- in + novare to make
>new,fr. novus new. See New.] 1. To bring in as new; to introduce as a
>novelty; as, to innovate a word or an act. [Archaic]
>
>Webster's RUD.
>
>Not the same.

A minor point, but Stephen's usage is standard economics usage, which can agree or disagree
with a dictionary.

In this case, it seems to me that it agrees with the dictionary but not standard usage.
Economics and dictionary: invent -- to find new; innovate -- to bring in as new.

Standard usage: invent and innovate are synonyms.

Hence, MS is a great innovator but doesn't invent much.

Jerry