Subject: Re: why we use what we use
From: "Brian J. Fox" <bfox@nirvana.datawave.net>
Date: 12 Dec 1997 22:08:46 -0000


   Date: Fri, 12 Dec 97 11:18 PST
   From: "L. Peter Deutsch" <ghost@aladdin.com>
   CC: fsb@crynwr.com, jla@arceneaux.com, bb@wv.com

   > What's wrong with gdb's user interface?  I find that gdb is much more
   > usable than Turbo Pascal's debugger, although the fact that gdb runs
   > on systems where the debugger doesn't crash when your program does
   > crash may be a factor...

   Compared with the state of Borland's debuggers as of approximately 5 years
   ago, I don't see a documented way to:

	   - Create a window/pane that is automatically updated to display the
   contents of the current stack frame whenever you stop.
	   - Create a scrollable, selectable menu window that is automatically
   updated to display the top N frames of the stack whenever you stop.
	   - Create a window/pane that automatically displays the contents of a
   variable or an expression whenever you stop.

Obviously, these would require the presence of a window system.  Is
the behaviour bad with the existing commands for use in terminals
(i.e. "display", "where", "bt")?

	   - Display a structure in an indented or nested form rather than a
   long string of text.

"set print pretty"

	   - Click on a source variable or expression and get it printed, or
   spawn a window with its contents if it is a pointer.

	   - Click on a stack frame in a menu and get its code and/or variables
   displayed.
	   - See breakpoints highlighted or otherwise marked within displayed
   code, whenever the code is displayed.

These all work just as you've stated, when running gdb under Emacs.

Brian
     ____________________________________________________________
     Brian J. Fox                                     bfox@ua.com
     http://www.metahtml.com/~bfox        http://www.metahtml.com
      "What's all this stuff about `websites' anyway?  Does this
       mean that I have to dust more often?"  -- Martha Davis, 1996