Subject: Re: DRM-incompatible licenses
From: Seth Johnson <seth.johnson@RealMeasures.dyndns.org>
Date: Wed, 05 Apr 2006 04:24:20 -0400


"Stephen J. Turnbull" wrote:
> 
> >>>>> "Seth" == Seth Johnson <seth.johnson@RealMeasures.dyndns.org> writes:
> 
>     Seth> "Stephen J. Turnbull" wrote:
> 
>     >> As I understand it, fair use is not a positive right,
>     >> prohibiting DRM.  It is a negative right, ie, a limitation on
>     >> the degree to which the copyright owner may use the courts to
>     >> impose restrictions.  It doesn't say that the copyright owner
>     >> must enable fair use copying, nor what the quality of those
>     >> copies should be.  (Eg, take a screen shot rather than copy the
>     >> PNG, analog rather than digital copies of music, etc.)
> 
>     Seth> Actually, in the U.S. statutes, the author's exclusive
>     Seth> rights are stipulated as being "subject to" the other
>     Seth> provisions for first sale, fair use, etc.
> 
>     Seth> So while the fair use provision is written in such a way as
>     Seth> to look like a loopy sort of exception to copyright, it's
>     Seth> actually the other way around.
> 
> How does that differ from what I wrote?  There still is no positive
> right to copy, except that of the author.  In the absence of
> copyright, there is the freedom to do so, but nobody is required to
> help you.


In short, almost every word you write here is the inverse of what
I said.  There are the inverse of what is acceptable in a free
society, I might add.

Copyright is an "exception" to the freedom to use published
information.

I need no "positive" right to use (and copy) the factual elements
of a published copyrighted work.


Seth


-- 

RIAA is the RISK!  Our NET is P2P!
http://www.nyfairuse.org/action/ftc

DRM is Theft!  We are the Stakeholders!

New Yorkers for Fair Use
http://www.nyfairuse.org

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