Subject: RE: A Game (Email - Kelly)
From: "Lawrence Rosen" <lrosen@rosenlaw.com>
Date: Fri, 14 Apr 2006 11:52:24 -0700

> companies buy anti-spam and anti-virus filters not because of improved
> productivity, but because of legal and other risks.

I buy anti-spam specifically because of improved productivity. I'd be awash
in junk without it.

I buy anti-virus because of the risk I'll lose my data or annoy my friends.

/Larry Rosen

> -----Original Message-----
> From: Larry M. Augustin [mailto:lma@lmaugustin.com]
> Sent: Friday, April 14, 2006 11:42 AM
> To: 'Don Marti'; 'Anderson, Kelly'
> Cc: fsb@crynwr.com
> Subject: RE: A Game (Email - Kelly)
> 
> A general comment on this whole thread: role-based email systems have been
> tried previously.  There were at least two companies I know of funded
> around
> 2002 with this pitch.  One of them in particular implemented this as
> plugins
> on Outlook/Exchange.  (No flames - it has a huge installed base, and if
> you
> want to enable the features described you can implement them on the client
> and server sides via Outlook and Exchange plugins and users don't need to
> change email clients or server to get the features.  That's an easy test
> market.)
> 
> The one in particular I'm thinking of even had the ability for someone
> sending email to view the roles of the recipient and tag the message as it
> was sent with the role, helping to improve the role-based filtering at the
> recipient.
> 
> Unfortunately, they weren't able to attract enough customers, and as far
> as
> I know both are now out of business.
> 
> One of the issues seems to be that there are too many people that dislike
> automatic inbox filtering.  Maybe it just hasn't been done right, but a
> lot
> of people seem to object to a piece of software automatically rooting
> around
> in their inbox.
> 
> Another issue is selling "improved productivity" is just hard.  "Buy this
> and you'll be more efficient" is much less compelling than "buy this and
> you'll be able to do something you weren't able to do before."  BTW,
> companies buy anti-spam and anti-virus filters not because of improved
> productivity, but because of legal and other risks.
> 
> Larry
> 
> --
> Larry M. Augustin
> +1.650.966.1759 / Phone | +1.415.609.3315 / Mobile | lmaugustin.com / Blog
> 
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: Don Marti [mailto:dmarti@zgp.org]
> > Sent: Friday, April 14, 2006 10:13 AM
> > To: Anderson, Kelly
> > Cc: fsb@crynwr.com
> > Subject: Re: A Game (Email - Kelly)
> >
> > begin Anderson, Kelly quotation of Fri, Apr 14, 2006 at 10:40:56AM -
> 0600:
> >
> > > I didn't explain myself well enough. Imagine a combo box (why a combo
> > > box? Because it's easy to imagine) containing "Father", "Programmer",
> > > "Student", "Homeowners Association", etc. When you pick "Homeowners
> > > Association" the emails you see are sorted in such a way that emails
> > > from the other board members of your homeowners association are at the
> > > top of the list. When you pick "Programmer", emails to the XP list are
> > > featured more prominently, etc.
> > >
> > > This is very different than just +ing the priority.
> >
> > So...the CMS, trouble ticket or CRM system just
> > sent out a bunch of mail that may or may not need my
> > attention any more.  Can this client talk back to that
> > server and ask "what's the stuff that someone else has
> > already handled that I can delete" or "what's are now
> > higher-priority items since I haven't answered them"
> > when I'm in "working" role?
> >
> > --
> > Don Marti
> > http://zgp.org/~dmarti/
> > dmarti@zgp.org