Subject: Re: Business
From: rocerp <rocerp@gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 11 May 2006 18:17:23 -0700
Thu, 11 May 2006 18:17:23 -0700
Similar but different situation....
I am looking for consultants in the Business Area to actively market  my
small erp solution www.rocerp.com.
I joined thinking I might learn more about Open Source and free Software,
and decided
from all that I have read, it is best,for me anyways, to simply make my
software proprietary and offered at very low Licensing fees (Zero upfront
fees if necessary) and sell services instead.
All this Free and Open source, Patents, etc. got me confused and worried...
All I need is to somewhat protect not software per say but the ability to
make service revenues from it.
Also to develop an good open source software will require too much
investment in documentation etc....

Sherif


On 5/11/06, Thomas Lord <lord@emf.net> wrote:
>
> David H. Lynch Jr. wrote:
> >
> >     I subscribed in the hope of tapping knowledge and wisdom to help
> > make a living as a Software Development consultant.
> >
> Yum!
>
> >
> >     I appear to be clueless at finding clients.
> >
>
> I think you can get the best advice if you tell us a little bit more about
> the kind of consulting you are good at and like to do.   We can, however,
> get some sense from your web site.
>
> >     What little information I have found via google sugests  "build a
> > web site and they will come". So far they are not coming.
> >
> Yes, that is pretty terrible advice.  A web site is not bad to have but,
> even once you
> have it, you still have sales and marketing to do.
>
> >     I have been actively scouring job boards but they seem to be
> > operated primarily for the benefit of recruiters who have zero real
> > interest in actual consultants.
> >
> It may not apply to your area but Craigslist has a classifieds section for
> "gigs", which can include consulting.    This is still not the best way to
> find clients but it can sometimes work.
>
> >     I have been actively scouring the FreeLance sites, but they seem
> > to have primarily become the domain of offshore consultants working at
> > rates I can not possibly meet.
> >
> Plus, the quality of people hiring there? -- no, no, skip that.
>
>
> >     Almost all the work I have gotten so far has been through
> > contacts. But that is only meeting about 1/3 of my fairly modest needs.
> >
> Yes.  And, guess what: contacts (everyone says and I agree) is the very
> best way to find new business.
>
> So, what's a contact?   On the one hand, it's people you already know.
> On the other hand, by gosh, it's people you go beat the pavement and
> meet all on your own.   Pick the most charismatic, charming, smooth
> operator you've ever known and think about -- in spite of the sliminess,
> what you actually admire and appreciate about that person.  Channel them.
> Speak with confident tones.  Look people in the eye.  Be gentle and
> honest.
> Listen, and try to create opportunities for people to tell you problems
> they
> need solved.    All that corny stuff.
>
> I think that embedded systems consulting is going to be a little tricky
> if you don't already have a lot of momentum in that area.  By the time
> someone needs those kinds of tech skills, they tend to already have them.
>
> The business systems stuff might do better, especially if you can find a
> niche.   What kind of money do you need/want?   Have you given any
> thought to the (real, not imagined) needs of small businesses in your
> region?
>
> >
> >     Since I would suspect many other members of this list are more
> > successful at this
> >
> >     What works ?
> >
> >
> I'm not more successful.   I do have some recent success, not much
> different
> than yours (a fraction of what I need) -- so I'm just passing along info
> about
> the gradient I'm climbing these days.
>
> How entrepreneurial are you (in the Phil Grahmish sense of wanting to
> work intensely for a while to get your life's need to earn money over
> quickly)?
>
> I think that there's not a few people in boats like yours and mine and
> that
> raises a meta-question: what can be done with all this underutilized
> talent
> and labor?   And that meta-question leads, imo, to a plethora of
> entrepreneurial
> opportunities.   But.... the catch-22 is that if you are in a *truly*
> economically
> distressed position at time T 0 (e.g., your ordinary-lifespan survival
> is basically
> horked given all available degrees of freedom), well, *that alone* means
> that
> no matter what entrepreneurial idea you come up with, it doesn't matter
> -- you're
> out.  People will steal from you before they bother to do business with
> you.
> People will tut tut and moralize about you behind your back.   People will
> go out of their way to hurt you.  Basically, you don't stand a chance.
>
> -t
>
>
>


Similar but different situation....
I am looking for consultants in the Business Area to actively market  my small erp solution www.rocerp.com.
I joined thinking I might learn more about Open Source and free Software, and decided
from all that I have read, it is best,for me anyways, to simply make my software proprietary and offered at very low Licensing fees (Zero upfront fees if necessary) and sell services instead.
All this Free and Open source, Patents, etc. got me confused and worried...
All I need is to somewhat protect not software per say but the ability to make service revenues from it.
Also to develop an good open source software will require too much investment in documentation etc....

Sherif


On 5/11/06, Thomas Lord <lord@emf.net> wrote:
David H. Lynch Jr. wrote:
>
>     I subscribed in the hope of tapping knowledge and wisdom to help
> make a living as a Software Development consultant.
>
Yum!

>
>     I appear to be clueless at finding clients.
>

I think you can get the best advice if you tell us a little bit more about
the kind of consulting you are good at and like to do.   We can, however,
get some sense from your web site.

>     What little information I have found via google sugests  "build a
> web site and they will come". So far they are not coming.
>
Yes, that is pretty terrible advice.  A web site is not bad to have but,
even once you
have it, you still have sales and marketing to do.

>     I have been actively scouring job boards but they seem to be
> operated primarily for the benefit of recruiters who have zero real
> interest in actual consultants.
>
It may not apply to your area but Craigslist has a classifieds section for
"gigs", which can include consulting.    This is still not the best way to
find clients but it can sometimes work.

>     I have been actively scouring the FreeLance sites, but they seem
> to have primarily become the domain of offshore consultants working at
> rates I can not possibly meet.
>
Plus, the quality of people hiring there? -- no, no, skip that.


>     Almost all the work I have gotten so far has been through
> contacts. But that is only meeting about 1/3 of my fairly modest needs.
>
Yes.  And, guess what: contacts (everyone says and I agree) is the very
best way to find new business.

So, what's a contact?   On the one hand, it's people you already know.
On the other hand, by gosh, it's people you go beat the pavement and
meet all on your own.   Pick the most charismatic, charming, smooth
operator you've ever known and think about -- in spite of the sliminess,
what you actually admire and appreciate about that person.  Channel them.
Speak with confident tones.  Look people in the eye.  Be gentle and honest.
Listen, and try to create opportunities for people to tell you problems they
need solved.    All that corny stuff.

I think that embedded systems consulting is going to be a little tricky
if you don't already have a lot of momentum in that area.  By the time
someone needs those kinds of tech skills, they tend to already have them.

The business systems stuff might do better, especially if you can find a
niche.   What kind of money do you need/want?   Have you given any
thought to the (real, not imagined) needs of small businesses in your
region?

>
>     Since I would suspect many other members of this list are more
> successful at this
>
>     What works ?
>
>
I'm not more successful.   I do have some recent success, not much different
than yours (a fraction of what I need) -- so I'm just passing along info
about
the gradient I'm climbing these days.

How entrepreneurial are you (in the Phil Grahmish sense of wanting to
work intensely for a while to get your life's need to earn money over
quickly)?

I think that there's not a few people in boats like yours and mine and that
raises a meta-question: what can be done with all this underutilized talent
and labor?   And that meta-question leads, imo, to a plethora of
entrepreneurial
opportunities.   But.... the catch-22 is that if you are in a *truly*
economically
distressed position at time T 0 (e.g., your ordinary-lifespan survival
is basically
horked given all available degrees of freedom), well, *that alone* means
that
no matter what entrepreneurial idea you come up with, it doesn't matter
-- you're
out.  People will steal from you before they bother to do business with you.
People will tut tut and moralize about you behind your back.   People will
go out of their way to hurt you.  Basically, you don't stand a chance.

-t