Subject: FYI: Limiting Copyright Term
From: Jean Camp <Jean_Camp@harvard.edu>
Date: Sun, 1 Aug 1999 10:29:58 -0400

This is an update on the remarkably modest lawsuit to limit the term of
copyright. I thought there maybe some interest here.

-Jean

COPYRIGHT'S COMMONS NEWSLETTER
(http://cyber.law.harvard.edu/cc)
OUR BRIEF IS FILED!

The Eldred v. Reno case is rapidly progressing.  Last Friday, the plaintiffs
filed a motion for judgment on the pleadings.  The brief incorporates
arguments from the openlaw site and sets forth a convincing argument that
the Copyright Term Extension Act is unconstitutional.  It is posted on the
Copyright's Commons site under Eldred v. Reno-- Legal Documents
(http://cyber.law.harvard.edu/eldredvreno/legaldocs.html).  We are anxiously
awaiting the court's response to the motion, and we will keep you informed
about any further developments.

ECONOMICS PROFESSOR SUPPORTS OUR ARGUMENT

In addition to filing a motion for judgment on the pleadings, the plaintiffs
in Eldred v. Reno submitted an affidavit from economics professor Hal
Varian.  Professor Varian argues that the Copyright Term Extension Statute
is irrational from an economic perspective.  The present value of an extra
dollar received from a work copyrighted fifty years ago is practically
zero-- hardly an incentive for authors.  Furthermore, he shows that the
retroactive effect of the Act creates no incentive for works that have
already been produced.  Professor Varian's affidavit is also posted on the
Legal Documents portion of the Eldred v. Reno site.

Thank you for your continued support!