Subject: Re: crux of the essence
From: Jean Camp <jean_camp@harvard.edu>
Date: Thu, 18 Oct 2001 16:38:17 -0400
Thu, 18 Oct 2001 16:38:17 -0400
At 15:29 -0400 10/18/01, Mark Rauterkus wrote:
>Hi *,
>
>What kind of reply is this?
>>  And MOOOOOO to you.

I thought it was a nicer reply to his word:"Bullshit", I was going 
with the whole cattle metaphor. ((Some replies (very funny) to the 
cervix post had me in kind of a theme humor mood.))

At 15:29 -0400 10/18/01, Mark Rauterkus wrote:
>Hi *,
>Dave made wonderful points to Tony that I agree with 100%.

He was wrong in the post I responded to. Information can be 
empowering and can increase access to health care, esp health care 
information, and access to wealth and all the good things that 
provides. Dave was assuming the Maslow's hierarchy of needs applies 
to development but sometimes health care follows IT. For example a 
leading problem in infant mortality is culturally passed down 'cures' 
to infant dehydration that are deadly more often than not. In this 
case information is life or death. Even in the earliest adoption of 
American rural telephony one reason was for the ability to contact 
the rural doctor.

I included links where IT has made a difference. And then a long PS 
about the theory of telecom and development.

Did you get only a MOOOO? Well that deserves a hmmmmmm.

I pointed out GrameenPhone, a long pdf report of the analysis of 
GrameenPhone, and included a screed about telecom and development 
which I will copy here. Telecom is a subcategory of CCTs.

The dismissal of IT for development was IMH and referenced O wrong. 
In particular it was wrong HERE because so much of the OS action 
could be happening in developing countries. Unless I was much 
mistaken Red Hat for example got the contract to put OS in all of 
Mexico's schools. In the case of the developing world, free software 
is a critical element of economics and justice. As the world economy 
emerges from this recession (3 months? 3 years?) those that have 
adopted pirate copies of MS will buy MS. Those that adopted OS will 
start to buy custom OS and OS support. Unfortunately the Soros 
Foundation and the World Bank are not clued into open and free 
software, despite my best efforts. CPSR has an African chapter 
(certainly not in Congo) but there are many steps in development and 
only a few places are currently hell on earth.

One or two or a few billion Chinese using Rd Flag or buying MS would 
make a big difference. There are alot of people who are going to go 
straight from the ninth century to the 21st.

Yes, political goals prevent other goals from happening. But the nice 
thing about IT is "technology" is often seen as neutral and then 
installed before the implications are clear to those with opposing 
agendas.

-Jean


TELECOM FOR DEVELOPMENT: A ONE PAGE INTRO

Telecommunications for development is a neo-liberal strategy based on 
deregulation and the potential of competition to expand access to 
communications facilities. Telecommunications expansion is not a goal 
in and of itself but rather is meant to support economic, political, 
and social goals. 
Telecommunications for economic development is not generic, but 
rather may be focused on one of many goals.   First nations may seek 
to connect literate populations with employment abroad. This 
human-resources intensive strategy is being pursued by India, which 
has a large number of English literate professionals is in a time 
zone complementary to the American West Coast.  In effect this is 
making distant jobs virtually local. This not only connects entire 
industries with the global market (e.g. software development), but 
also allows employment of transcribers, translators, and data entry 
clerks to serve industries of other nations.
Secondly telecommunications development may seek to reduce the cost 
of locating in a country by providing connectivity to all world 
markets. Connectivity makes is possible for nations to leverage low 
wage rates and favorable tax environments in order to compete as a 
location for manufacturing facilities. This was  the goal of 
Malaysia's Multimedia Super Corridor.  This would move jobs to local 
people.
Alternatively telecommunications for economic development may focus 
on connecting local markets for handmade goods to distant locations. 
A classic example of this is People Link (www.peoplink.org) which 
uses  its Internet-based catalogue to connect pre-industrial 
producers with post-industrial consumers.  People Link provides the 
scanners, cameras, connectivity and training to enable producers to 
sell their goods over the network.
Finally,  telecommunications for development may seek to connect 
internal markets more effectively with each other. Korea has this 
model (although hardly a developing country) has this focus for 
telecommunications. By connecting the country and the industries more 
effectively, national industries can move to less desirable area in 
Korea, and Korean industry can more effectively compete overseas. . 
This approach to development concerns improving the connectivity of 
internal markets, waste reduction, and improving overall government 
and private sector efficiency within the country.  This dimension 
focuses on developing assets (specifically human assets) within the 
country rather than connecting to the global market per se.
Telecommunications in Bangladesh focuses on connecting the country to 
itself more effectively. Telecommunications reform in Bangladesh has 
followed the neo-liberal paradigm to increase internal connectivity, 
while the World Bank has invested in satellite links to increase 
Bangladesh's international connectivity.  
There are several reasons to consider telecommunications development 
as equivalent to development in general.  Rapidly advancing 
telecommunications technology is a prime means to achieve a wide 
range of social and economic goals in numerous socially oriented 
sectors.  Sector improvements can include the delivery of education 
and health services and the facilitation of poverty alleviation 
programs (Schmandt, et al 1989). The facilities constructed to extend 
the telecommunications infrastructure will influence the pace and 
direction of the overall expansion and modernization of the economy. 
The major goals of the telecommunications for development approach 
are the construction of an advanced and efficient telecommunications 
infrastructure and the liberalization of national telecommunication 
industries.  This development is to be enabled through privatization 
and deregulation, without emphasizing the use of mass or 
interpersonal media to bring about attitude change or to diffuse the 
ideas and innovations founding the approach.  In this light, the 
value of telecommunications is considered the sum total of increased 
access to information and opportunities for entrepreneurs (McDowell, 
1997).
Yet it is important to consider the goals of a telecommunications for 
development rather when evaluating the potential of a particular 
technology in a given regulatory regime to  be an effective driver 
for development. The choice of technologies used to modernize and 
expand the main telecommunications network influence the development 
of the sector and the applications of information technology in the 
future (Saunders, et al, 1994).

-- 


Re: crux of the essence
At 15:29 -0400 10/18/01, Mark Rauterkus wrote:
Hi *,
What kind of reply is this?
> And MOOOOOO to you.

I thought it was a nicer reply to his word:"Bullshit", I was going with the whole cattle metaphor. ((Some replies (very funny) to the cervix post had me in kind of a theme humor mood.))

At 15:29 -0400 10/18/01, Mark Rauterkus wrote:
Hi *,
Dave made wonderful points to Tony that I agree with 100%.

He was wrong in the post I responded to. Information can be empowering and can increase access to health care, esp health care information, and access to wealth and all the good things that provides. Dave was assuming the Maslow's hierarchy of needs applies to development but sometimes health care follows IT. For example a leading problem in infant mortality is culturally passed down 'cures' to infant dehydration that are deadly more often than not. In this case information is life or death. Even in the earliest adoption of American rural telephony one reason was for the ability to contact the rural doctor.

I included links where IT has made a difference. And then a long PS about the theory of telecom and development.

Did you get only a MOOOO? Well that deserves a hmmmmmm.

I pointed out GrameenPhone, a long pdf report of the analysis of GrameenPhone, and included a screed about telecom and development which I will copy here. Telecom is a subcategory of CCTs.

The dismissal of IT for development was IMH and referenced O wrong. In particular it was wrong HERE because so much of the OS action could be happening in developing countries. Unless I was much mistaken Red Hat for example got the contract to put OS in all of Mexico's schools. In the case of the developing world, free software is a critical element of economics and justice. As the world economy emerges from this recession (3 months? 3 years?) those that have adopted pirate copies of MS will buy MS. Those that adopted OS will start to buy custom OS and OS support. Unfortunately the Soros Foundation and the World Bank are not clued into open and free software, despite my best efforts. CPSR has an African chapter (certainly not in Congo) but there are many steps in development and only a few places are currently hell on earth.

One or two or a few billion Chinese using Rd Flag or buying MS would make a big difference. There are alot of people who are going to go straight from the ninth century to the 21st.

Yes, political goals prevent other goals from happening. But the nice thing about IT is "technology" is often seen as neutral and then installed before the implications are clear to those with opposing agendas.

-Jean


TELECOM FOR DEVELOPMENT: A ONE PAGE INTRO

Telecommunications for development is a neo-liberal strategy based on deregulation and the potential of competition to expand access to communications facilities. Telecommunications expansion is not a goal in and of itself but rather is meant to support economic, political, and social goals. 
Telecommunications for economic development is not generic, but rather may be focused on one of many goals.   First nations may seek to connect literate populations with employment abroad. This human-resources intensive strategy is being pursued by India, which has a large number of English literate professionals is in a time zone complementary to the American West Coast.  In effect this is making distant jobs virtually local. This not only connects entire industries with the global market (e.g. software development), but also allows employment of transcribers, translators, and data entry clerks to serve industries of other nations.
Secondly telecommunications development may seek to reduce the cost of locating in a country by providing connectivity to all world markets. Connectivity makes is possible for nations to leverage low wage rates and favorable tax environments in order to compete as a location for manufacturing facilities. This was  the goal of Malaysia's Multimedia Super Corridor.  This would move jobs to local people.
Alternatively telecommunications for economic development may focus on connecting local markets for handmade goods to distant locations. A classic example of this is People Link (www.peoplink.org) which uses  its Internet-based catalogue to connect pre-industrial producers with post-industrial consumers.  People Link provides the scanners, cameras, connectivity and training to enable producers to sell their goods over the network.
Finally,  telecommunications for development may seek to connect internal markets more effectively with each other. Korea has this model (although hardly a developing country) has this focus for telecommunications. By connecting the country and the industries more effectively, national industries can move to less desirable area in Korea, and Korean industry can more effectively compete overseas. . This approach to development concerns improving the connectivity of internal markets, waste reduction, and improving overall government and private sector efficiency within the country.  This dimension focuses on developing assets (specifically human assets) within the country rather than connecting to the global market per se.
Telecommunications in Bangladesh focuses on connecting the country to itself more effectively. Telecommunications reform in Bangladesh has followed the neo-liberal paradigm to increase internal connectivity, while the World Bank has invested in satellite links to increase Bangladesh's international connectivity.  
There are several reasons to consider telecommunications development as equivalent to development in general.  Rapidly advancing telecommunications technology is a prime means to achieve a wide range of social and economic goals in numerous socially oriented sectors.  Sector improvements can include the delivery of education and health services and the facilitation of poverty alleviation programs (Schmandt, et al 1989). The facilities constructed to extend the telecommunications infrastructure will influence the pace and direction of the overall expansion and modernization of the economy. 
The major goals of the telecommunications for development approach are the construction of an advanced and efficient telecommunications infrastructure and the liberalization of national telecommunication industries.  This development is to be enabled through privatization and deregulation, without emphasizing the use of mass or interpersonal media to bring about attitude change or to diffuse the ideas and innovations founding the approach.  In this light, the value of telecommunications is considered the sum total of increased access to information and opportunities for entrepreneurs (McDowell, 1997).
Yet it is important to consider the goals of a telecommunications for development rather when evaluating the potential of a particular technology in a given regulatory regime to  be an effective driver for development. The choice of technologies used to modernize and expand the main telecommunications network influence the development of the sector and the applications of information technology in the future (Saunders, et al, 1994).

--