Subject: Re: improving project maintainership
From: "Stephen J. Turnbull" <stephen@xemacs.org>
Date: 11 Feb 2002 16:16:25 +0900

>>>>> "Tom" == Tom Lord <lord@regexps.com> writes:

    Tom>        Stephen:

       You're looking for an infrastructure to promote more collaborative
       development, especially cooperation on things like testing core
       components, without inhibiting the ability of individual projects or
       developers to vary in pursuit of their individual goals.  Close?

    Tom> Neither right nor wrong.  Your summary is too far removed
    Tom> from engineering issues to assess.

Of course.  So was my critique.

[Interesting discussion snipped for more careful perusal.]

    Tom> To try and warp this into support for your critique of the
    Tom> FSF's behavior toward non-Free software is, um, a bit of a
    Tom> stretch.

Not intended.  What I intended was to describe a role, "infrastructure
developer".  The fact that you also see the need for explicitly
filling that role is all I was implying.  I don't think it can be
effectively filled by GNU without a change of policy.  But I didn't
mean to imply that you supported that analysis.

Also, my critique is not of the FSF's and GNU's behavior toward
non-free software as such.  In fact, I myself no longer use any
non-free software except Aladdin Ghostscript (which is a matter of
principle for me, not to mention I'd like to return to beta testing gs
in the near future).  This is at quite some cost, as my colleagues are
clearly settling on MS attachments as the de facto standard for
information interchange.

It is only in the context of alienating allies, and in the context of
the dynamic reality that proprietary software does and will continue
to exist, and that proprietary entities will continue to hold
intellectual property in many desirable applications with no or poor
free implementations for the foreseeable future, that I am criticizing
the FSF's and GNU's policies.

-- 
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