Subject: RH in the news
From: Tom Lord <lord@regexps.com>
Date: Mon, 18 Feb 2002 01:43:56 -0800 (PST)


From "http://news.com.com/2100-1001-823736.html":

	But the new version won't be as easy to copy as current
	versions of Linux, he said. Red Hat offers "ISO" editions of
	its product, single large files that can be copied to a blank
	CD to recreate installation disks. That practice won't
	continue with the Advanced Server product, Cormier said.

	Because the individual components still will be available,
	people will be able to re-create what makes up the
	product. But they'll have to find and download the required
	software packages themselves.

Oh dear.  Interesting to contrast with:

From "http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/zd/20020204/tc/q_a_red_hat_ceo_says_linux_won_t_rule_1.html"

	[Bob Young speaking]

	In 1996 or 1997, we won this big award from InfoWorld, we tied
	with Windows NT as the best server operating system. The
	people who were most shocked by this were those of us at Red
	Hat, because there were 23 of us, including the receptionist,
	in the tobacco fields of North Carolina at the time. And
	Microsoft had put a billion dollars into NT, and they'd
	started the project three years before Red Hat was even
	formed, and the best they could do was to tie us for the damn
	award. Who rewrote the laws of economics?

	What it hammered home for us was the key value was not what
	Red Hat was doing, it was this collaborative model we were
	enabling.

Of course, he also continued:

	Fast forward from 1997 and where is the community today? You
	read Slashdot, and people say, "this is all sold out, I'm not
	contributing my code anymore." We may have alienated the early
	free software foundation, Richard Stallman's group -- some of
	those guys are true idealogues, and they contributed software
	for truly altruistic reasons. But those were always a smaller
	part of the developer community.

Optimisticly he adds:

	So it ends up being a true barter system. Well, for every
	basement programmer we might have alienated, we've gained ten
	programmers out of SAP or IBM.

Sure, I'm sure RH can count on their continued collaboration
indefinately, now that RH is aiming at attacking their business in
such a collaborative manner.


-t

Disclaimer: I am, sadly at the moment, a shareholder in RH.