Subject: Re: [lord@regexps.com: Re: [lord@regexps.com: Re: arch advocates]]
From: Ian Lance Taylor <ian@airs.com>
Date: 29 Aug 2002 22:06:52 -0700

Tom Lord <lord@regexps.com> writes:

> 	> that they already percieve that they have
> 
> [From the grand book of yadda yadda yadda (it just keeps going on like
> this!)]: But what if they are blind to the foolishness of how they are
> using the technology they possess?  What's the sales tactic in that
> case?

I don't know why you ask these questions, when you don't listen to the
answers.  Why don't you just answer them yourself?  You could
construct a complete Socratic dialogue.  It would probably be more
interesting than the current approach of asking a question and
scoffing at the answer.  And look where Socrates wound up.

Basically, I assume that you are unable or unwilling to listen.
However, answering your question may help order my thoughts, and may
help others reading this list.

There are two basic sales tactics for technology, and, indeed, most
things sold to businesses: 1) with my technology, you can make more
money by doing something you couldn't do before (i.e., increase
revenue); 2) with my technology, you can save money you are currently
spending (i.e., cut costs).

Any sales effort should normally be organized around one of those two
positions.  You should describe as precisely as possible the amount of
money involved.

You should also think clearly about features and benefits.  Features
are cool things your technology does.  These are unimportant for the
sales process.  Benefits are concrete and direct ways in which your
technology helps your customer.  Often a feature leads directly to a
benefit.  Your customers don't care about the features.  You should
describe the benefits.

In short, it's obvious what to do when somebody is blind to the
foolishness of how they are using the technology they possess.  You
explain to them the benefits of a different approach, and you quantify
the increased revenue or decreased costs of the different approach.

If you can't do that, well, perhaps you are wrong about how foolish
your customers are being.

Ian