Subject: Re: [coallesced replies] Re: how to create 21,780 new free software jobs (2,530 in R&D)
From: Rich Bodo <rsb@ostel.com>
Date: Mon, 11 Nov 2002 10:50:20 -0800 (PST)


A nice big target for web-appliances is the "grandma set", i.e. AOL or
WebTV users.  This would allow you to eschew the PC and market CDs ala
AOL.  You would need a CD-based linux distro, the discipline to pare
down functionality, and the super-duper network thingy.  I guess you
could sell PC's too.  I would at least vaporware them to check out the
demand.

-Rich

Rich Bodo | rsb@ostel.com | 650-964-4678

On Mon, 11 Nov 2002, Nick Jennings wrote:

> On Sun, Nov 10, 2002 at 04:22:31PM -0800, Rob Helmer wrote:
> >
> > Also, many computer users have more than one computer - some
> > need to run Windows for certain applications, some like
> > Macs but also need to run Windows, etc. The fact is, alot
> > of people like Linux, but they don't know how to maintain it.
>
>  Many computer users? Sure. Majority? I think not. Though I guess
>  argument could be made to describe our target audience as someone
>  with more than just this provided system. "Use this when your
>  workstation breaks" ? :)
>
>
> > Personally, I don't think Windows is any easier to maintain than
> > Linux, but all the maintenance tools are GUI.
>
>  This is false if not for any other reason than the majority of the
>  population is more familiar with Windows than Linux. It's not something
>  you can ignore and simply base your conclusion on an informed evaluation
>  of the two products without taking this into consideration.
>
>
> > This is not any better
> > in my opinion, it still takes time to maintain and fix my
> > computer before/when it breaks, when I want to be doing other things
> > on the computer. Also, upgrades are, by neccessity, manual. People
> > usually wait until the next version comes out on CD, and make
> > that "big jump" to upgrade, instead of taking incremental steps.
> >
> > I've known many people, including myself, to waste days upgrading
> > their OS. Pick an OS, any OS.
>
> I think a big difference here is that Windows releases a new product every
> few years, wheras Linux distro's usually make 2-3 releases a year (even
> Debian would if they could get thier act together :)
>
>
>
> As far as your technical run-down of how to support the ability to
> install unsupported applications, I agree with you. It's a technicality
> and not a real show stopper by any means.
>
> - Nick Jennings
>
>