Subject: Re: 'Athens' built on strategy for new PC golden age
From: Seth Johnson <seth.johnson@RealMeasures.dyndns.org>
Date: Thu, 08 May 2003 14:54:07 -0400


Seth Gordon wrote:
> 
> (I don't think Palladium is much to worry about.  If Microsoft ever does
> sell Palladium-equipped PCs, they *must* be able to run legacy Microsoft
> software, or consumers will refuse to buy it.  If you can use sofware on
> a legacy Microsoft OS to play an MP3 or MPEG file, you will still be
> able to do that on a Palladium-equipped PC.  So the industry's existing
> piracy problem -- illicit copies being circulated by Kazaa and what-not
> -- will not be affected by Palladium.  I suspect that some people at
> Microsoft are perfectly aware of that, but are quite happy to talk up
> copy protection to help close deals with "content providers" who don't
> know any better.  In short, Palladium is not about Microsoft helping
> Hollywood fleece consumers; it's about Microsoft fleecing Hollywood.)


Palladium and TCPA let outsiders set the rules for what you can do with your
own machine.

Developers will be able to develop new formats that have so-called "digital
rights management" built in, and will be assured that Palladiated systems
will enforce those "rights" in a manner that their owners won't be able to
get around.

Statutory exclusive rights are secondary to fundamental rights.  Until we
face this reality as a society, shortsighted policies will be instituted
based on the idea that all systems should be designed according to models
like those Palladium and TCPA represent, and the use of "legacy" systems,
apps and files will be characterized as illegitimate.

Seth Johnson


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